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Thread: Pancake and Biscuit Mix for Longterm Storage?

  1. #1

    Pancake and Biscuit Mix for Longterm Storage?

    Hello! I'm new to the site. I've been into longterm food storage now for 2 years. My question was about pancake and biscuit mix ( I bought from Gordon Food Supply), I've got about 100 lbs. of both types of mix stored in 5 gallon food grade buckets with mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. I thought that both mixes would last at least 8 to 10 years in my storage, but recently read that baking soda has a shelf life of only one year- I would have to add more baking soda to the mixes to get the dough to rise? Has anyone else heard of this? Thank you.

  2. #2
    Sustainable Stowaway
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    I don't have anything to add, possumtohide, but I did want to say welcome!

  3. #3
    Thank you for the welcome! I've been reading this forum since I found it two weeks ago, alot of excellent information. I'm just worried about the pancake and biscuit mix storage, I don't want to discover my food storage ruined if the economy collapses. I have plenty of rice, beans, pasta products, potato flakes, oats, cream of wheat, etc. in 5 gallon buckets stored, I was trying to add variety to my base food storage with the mixes. It was cheaper for me to buy the mixes in bulk and place in the buckets myself. Honeyville Farms and Mountain house sell bread mixes, etc., but the price is high.

  4. #4
    Sustainable Stowaway cactus wren's Avatar
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    from Joy Of Cooking

    Baking soda has an indefinite shelf life if stored in a sealed container in a cool dry place.

    Read more: http://www.joyofbaking.com/bakingsod...#ixzz17iggkMBZ


    To test baking powder's effectiveness: mix 1 teaspoon (5 grams) baking powder with 1/2 cup (120 ml) hot water and the mixture should bubble immediately. Store in a cool dry place and it should be replaced every 6-12 months.



    Read more: http://www.joyofbaking.com/bakingsod...#ixzz17igyaxw8

  5. #5
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
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    Baking soda lasts forever. I've got a huge open box in my pantry that I've been using for years now. It's fine.

    The storage conditions in that case are crappy. I imagine under good conditions, you'd be good for decades.

    P.S. Welcome!
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  6. #6
    Thank you for the information and links! It looks like my supplies will be all right, I've trying to look for "variety" in the foods that I'm storing now. I just ordered tomato paste from Honeyville Foods- I wanted a case of powdered eggs, but they are still out. I still need to add wheat stores, but have not because I need a mill yet. I've put away about 100 lbs of white flour for now.

    I think at times that I'm done, but that does not seem the case, I always add a little more each week!

  7. #7
    Sustainable Mascot SubAliasTen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by POSSUMTOHIDE View Post
    I think at times that I'm done, but that does not seem the case, I always add a little more each week!
    I find I'm never done. It started with X months for my me, my wife and kids. Then it went to Y months. Now it's Y months + Z (so I have the option of helping other family or someone I find would bring a valuable skill to an emergency situation.)

    Hopefully I stay on the right side of the "crazy" line

  8. #8
    Sustainable Mascot SubAliasTen's Avatar
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    Oh, www.readyreservefoods.com sells bread and pancake mix in nitrogen-packed #10 cans that they claim have a shelf life of 20+ years. So I think you're good with with your storage setup.

  9. #9
    Speaking of readyreservefoods and mountain house brands, I read on the www.chrismartenson.com site that both are reporting high volumes of sales lately, one of the web sites are temporarily suspending sales of #10 cans. I find that when I read bad economic news, I tend to start stocking up again. I feel that I have to do something positive for my family in light of the grim, economic news. I sometimes panic, and run to the local Sam's club to stock up on more oats, etc.

  10. #10
    Sustainable Member weaver's Avatar
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    I just opened a box of store brand/store bought biscuit mix tonight for biscuits & gravy with an EXP DATE of 4/2008 and my biscuits were decidedly flat and dense, not fluffy and flakey. The rising agent in this cardboard box must have aged despite being stored in a plastic tub in the dark. They were certainly edible but not especially great.
    looking for a great handwoven item for someone special? http://www.etsy.com/shop/PermaWeaver

  11. #11
    I think my mixes will be fine, I've used a vacuum sealer first- then sealed each bag in mylar with oxygen absorbers and a 5 gallon bucket. I bought these mixes in the hope of giving my family some selection with the usual rice and beans, etc. I'm next going to buy some gravy, bouillon, etc. to help add some flaver to my storage.

  12. #12
    Sustainable Member Broil's Avatar
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    I once had a 5 lb bag of pancake mix put away for maybe a year, probably less, and then it was like rock and looked a bit moldy. But then I didn't pack it like you did. I think you should just crack one open and start using it, you're supposed to rotate anyway.

  13. #13
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    Stumbled across this and thought I'd explain that...

    Baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) is alkaline and releases gas when mixed with an acid ingredient in your recipe - like honey for example. The gas makes bubbles in your batter or dough and these bubbles make your recipe "light" or leavened.

    Baking powder is simply baking soda with the acid (cream of tarter) already mixed in. It needs is a liquid to react and make bubbles in your pancakes but not necessarily an acid.

    Baking powder doesn't store well because the two ingredients want to react and any speck of humidity lets them go to it.

    Baking soda and cream of tarter on the other hand are stable as long as they are stored seperate so last pretty well forever. So just store them separately and you're set.
    Last edited by Pops; 01-24-2012 at 11:00 AM.

  14. #14
    Sustainable Contributor
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    That is the kind of totally useful information I come here for. Thank you so much. It explains a lot.

  15. #15
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
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    This is super! Thank you, Pops.

    I got curious and this is the recipe for mixing the two to make baking powder.

    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon corn starch (optional)

    Preparation:

    Mix the baking soda and cream of tartar together until well combined. Use immediately.

  16. #16
    Sustainable Contributor
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    This goes on my blog tomorrow.

  17. #17
    Sustainable Stowaway roach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubAliasTen View Post
    Hopefully I stay on the right side of the "crazy" line
    Wait, there's a line?
    if we can make it though the landslide standing, we'll lift each other up to see the bliss on the horizon

  18. #18
    Sustainable Stowaway spacecase0's Avatar
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    whole grains store longer,
    if you set up a grain mill and grind it when you need it you will not have to many issues

    any flour kind of thing I need to store,
    I put in a 1/2 gallon canning jar and take the air out,
    it works amazing for corn meal and other things I have tried.

  19. #19
    Sustainable Member HappyTexan's Avatar
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    Well son of a gun..you learn something new every day.

    Going to dig out all of my baking powders from storage and use them up and replace with baking soda/cream of tartar.
    Thanks for this. One less thing to store and rotate.

  20. #20
    Sustainable Regular margx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally View Post
    This is super! Thank you, Pops.

    I got curious and this is the recipe for mixing the two to make baking powder.

    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon corn starch (optional)

    Preparation:

    Mix the baking soda and cream of tartar together until well combined. Use immediately.
    I have used that mixture, both with and with out starch, myself quite a few times when I have found I am out of Powder and it works fine.
    Welcome to the site POSSUMTOHIDE !

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