...advertisement
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 41

Thread: Canning Recipes - Meals in a Jar

  1. #1
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288

    Canning Recipes - Meals in a Jar

    Roach had a good idea about putting together a recipe compendium. I thought I'd kick off this particular section with a good chili recipe.

    With this, you can make as many quart jars as you want. A bonus is that you do not have to soak the beans first.

    This is not my original recipe. I don't know who developed it. Various versions of it are all over the internet because it is easy schmeasy.

    You can see both the original recipe, which was what I followed the first time I made this, and my "use what I have on hand" substitutions.


    Many layer chili

    In each quart jar you layer

    1/2 cup dry beans. I like black beans but you can use pinto, kidney, whatever
    1 1/4 cups cooked or raw ground beef or cubed stew meat (or if you live at my place, ground goat)
    1/2 cup chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned
    1/4 cup chopped onion
    1/4 cup green chili (or pickled banana peppers)
    2 tablespoons plus 1 tsp tomato sauce (or 2 teaspoons tomato powder)
    2 tablespoons chili powder
    1 tsp salt
    1/4 teaspoon cumin
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    pinch of black pepper

    Then fill with water to 1 inch below the rim, and process for 90 minutes at 10 pounds pressure or for whatever you need for your altitude.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  2. #2
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288
    Chicken soup, thrifty meat version

    In each quart jar, layer:

    1/2 cup chopped chicken, cooked or raw
    1 1/2 cup diced potatoes
    1 cup chopped carrots
    1/4 cup chopped onions
    1/2 cup chopped celery
    1 garlic clove, minced
    Salt and pepper to taste (or omit and add them when you open the jar)
    Chicken stock to fill (if you don't have stock, use water and two cubes chicken bouillon)

    Process 90 minutes for quarts, 75 for pints, at 10 pounds pressure or whatever is suitable for your altitude.

    This recipe is infinitely adjustable. Want to throw in some lima beans but use less carrots? More potato, less celery? Turkey instead of chicken? More, or less, meat? Fine with me, as long as you do not exceed the magical 3 3/4 cups of solids. ,

    You can put COOKED beans in it if you want to. Do not use dry beans, they'll expand too much.

    Want to turn it into vegetable beef soup? Substitute stew meat for the chicken, reduce to 1 cup diced potatoes and 1/2 cup chopped carrots, add 1 cup chopped tomatoes. If you want a very thick tomato-ey sauce, also add a tablespoon or two of tomato paste or a couple teaspoons of tomato powder.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  3. #3
    Sustainable Regular Raeven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Wilds of Oregon
    Posts
    301
    Lisa... I'm making your chili tomorrow morning. Thanks so much for the recipe -- it's going to be used again and again, I can see that! My only "adds" will be these: In place of half the water, I will use flat beer, and I will add a minced clove of garlic to each jar. I'll let you know how that turns out, if you like.

    Thanks again!
    Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change ready.

  4. #4
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288
    That would be great!

    OK, here's a favorite:

    Cajun Red Beans, With or Without Meat

    7 cups dry red kidney beans
    3 cups onions, chopped
    3 cups celery, chopped
    3 cups bell peppers, chopped
    6 large cloves garlic, minced
    1 T thyme
    1 T oregano
    2 t cayenne
    6-8 bay leaves
    Salt to taste (or omit and add when you serve)
    2 lbs sliced smoked sausage, if desired

    Soak the beans overnight. In the morning, drain, put in a heavy pot, add everything else, and re-cover with water. Simmer for 2 hours, until beans are softening. Remove the bay leaves. Ladle into jars.

    Process 90 minutes for quarts, 75 for pints, at 10 pounds or whatever pressure is appropriate for your altitude.

    Serve over rice (I like brown but white is traditional).

    ETA: If you omit the smoked sausage, this'll make around 14 pints. One pint, served over rice. is plenty for a meal for two people. If you add the sausage, it'll make more like 16 pints.
    Last edited by Lisa; 01-02-2011 at 10:32 PM.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  5. #5
    Sustainable Stowaway Grower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    North Central Ohio
    Posts
    587
    How many quarts/pints does that generally make?

    btw, thanks for this thread. I'd like to start doing one batch of something like this about every other weekend, to get my stocks of grabbables built up.

    How would you do ham and beans? I'd prefer the beans not to have to be cooked, but maybe that wouldn't work.
    Last edited by Grower; 01-02-2011 at 09:10 PM.
    “The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living on a small piece of land...” - Abraham Lincoln

  6. #6
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288
    Grower, I had a whole long post worked up about the ham and beans, and then it disappeared. Sigh.

    I have not done it with dry beans. Dry beans are tricky, 'cause the rate of expansion is somewhat unpredictable. But, but if you want to experiment, you could try making a quart with 3/4 level cup (Not heaping! Err on the side of too few, not too many) dry beans and 1 cup ham, plus whatever spices you wanted, and stock to the fill line. See how it behaves. 90 minutes for quarts, 75 for pints, 10 lbs.

    Or, you could just make a really gargantuan pot of your normal recipe for dinner, eat what you want, and then can the rest. That's what I usually do.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  7. #7
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,917
    Basic Meatballs

    6 eggs
    1 1/2 cups water
    1 Tbs salt
    6 pounds ground beef
    6 cups soft bread crumbs
    1 cup finely chopped onion
    1/4 tsp pepper

    In a large bowl, combine all ingredients except the beef. Then add the beef and mix well. Shape into 12 dozen 1 inch meatballs. Place in shallow baking pan. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes (they won't be "done" - but will hold together). Pack loosely into 8 pint jars, leaving 1 inch head space. Add boiling water or meat juice, keeping that 1 inch head space. Cap and process at 10 pounds pressure, 75 minutes for pints and 90 minutes for quarts.

    Notes: I used 4 cups bread crumbs, 1 cup crushed saltines, and 1 cup oatmeal (you can tell I sort of scrounge when I can). Each meatball measured 1/8 cup. I put 12 meatballs per jar with 1 cup broth (I used beef broth and some "tomato water" - that's the "juice" you get when you put tomatoes through a steam juicer - it's a clear, watery tomato juice and works wonderfully as the "water" for this and for canning beans). My yield was 13 pints, narrow mouth - so I had a substantially higher yield than the recipe said. Use really lean ground beef and you won't get so much fat.

    We eat these either with spaghetti, or sometimes just over rice or potatoes or noodles.

  8. #8
    Sustainable Stowaway cactus wren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    high desert NM
    Posts
    690
    Ok,Sally, sounds good.,but....................

    Is the use NO stuff like bread crumbs,eggs etc when canning another one of those edicts not tested ?

  9. #9
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,917
    Is the use NO stuff like bread crumbs,eggs etc when canning another one of those edicts not tested ?
    "They" also say no fat. Yet "they" turn around and give you instructions on how to can meat, which has fat in it. Go figure.

    I try to avoid flour used as a thickener. There is a wonderful product called Clearjel, which is a modified corn starch, that is used in canning as a thickener instead. The reason for this is not safety. It's because flour just sort of globs up and often doesn't turn out nicely. Clearjel, on the other hand, stays relatively thin when you're putting the food in the jar and stays thinnish when heated, and then thickens after it cools, making it perfect for canning. It's been used forever in the commercial canning industry (ever see "modified food starch" on the label - at least some of the time, that's Clearjel).

    I get it at my local Amish store, but you can also buy it on line, although it's more expensive that way. I use it primarily in pie fillings. (Another option is to can the fruit without it, and then thicken with ordinary corn starch after opening the jar, but that adds yet another step.) Here's a source at Amazon, but there are others. It's far cheaper if you can find an Amish store. There is another product called "Instant Clearjel" but you don't want that for canning. The regular Clearjel, or Clearjel A as it's sometimes called, is the stuff that withstands heat so well. My apple pie filling looks just like the commercial stuff, only better - it tastes better, and I pack the jars so there's not so much glop.

    I digress though. The question was about bread crumbs and eggs, etc. Much of the no-nos in canning from the USDA have nothing whatever to do with safety and everything to do with how well the product cans and withstands heat. Some things CAN be canned, but that doesn't mean that they SHOULD be canned, nor is canning necessarily the "best" way to preserve them.

    An example of this is strawberries. We have a nice sized strawberry patch and had lot of them this year. I needed to preserve them, and I'm really loathe to freeze things if I can figure out another way. So I dehydrated some of them. That's fine, but to use dehydrated ones, I have to think about it ahead of time, and rehydrate them. I wanted them canned. So I looked up canning strawberries. Not recommended. So, I checked to see why. It's because they tend to lose their color. They just don't look beautiful in the jar. They tend to do better if you sprinkle them with sugar and allow them to sit for a little while before canning them, but they still just don't look beautiful like peaches. No matter. I canned them anyway. We love them. So, phooey on "not recommended."

    When it comes to starchy things like macaroni, and rice, and yes, bread crumbs, they say, "No." Well, no - you shouldn't can a jar of rice. It will get all gummed up and just be awful. Would it be "safe"? Probably, but you'd likely have to dig it out of the jar, and it would not be terribly appetizing. HOWEVER, I have added a very small amount of rice to canned soups from time to time, and it works fine. (By "small", I mean a couple of Tbs. to a quart jar.) I suspect that macaroni would go all to pieces, so I've never tried it.

    The problem is that the USDA just puts commentary like "not recommended," and doesn't tell you WHY. They do not seem to differentiate between "don't do this because it's not safe" and "don't do this because the resultant product is gross." It's left to us to figure out which it is.

    The bread crumbs/starch and eggs in meatballs are perfectly safe. They reach the required temp for the required time. The texture is another thing. Some people do not like it. It's a little bit softer than it would be if they were simply baked fresh.

    Do remember, too, that the USDA and many canning books are trying to inform people of the "best" method of preserving a particular food. And in their world, freezing is an option - in fact, freezing is probably the primary option. When we come along and eliminate that as an option, or at least, put it last on the list instead of first, it changes the equation a bit. Hence, the person looks at Happydog (I think it was Happydog) and says, about the steer, "Why you just put it in your freezer, dear..." And my book tells me that I should freeze my strawberries - and my meatballs. But neither that person nor my book are living in my reality.

    Does all that make sense? The primary safety issues with canning are differentiating between acid and non-acid foods. It's getting the food hot enough, depending on whether it's high acid or low acid, and keeping it there for the required length of time. The resultant product will be safe if you do that. Will it taste good and look good? That's another story. It may (canned peaches are terrific, and I like canned green beans far better than frozen ones), or it may not (sweet and sour chicken with pineapple absolutely sucks).

    It's a great idea when canning a new food to do just a jar or two, even though it seems like a waste of time, just to be sure you like it. I'm really glad I didn't make 25 quarts of sweet and sour chicken with pineapple. :-)

  10. #10
    Sustainable Stowaway
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    849
    If Clearjel is modified food starch, then I think you can't use it if you are gluten intolerant.

  11. #11
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,917
    Clearjel is corn starch. "Modified food starch" can be corn or wheat or anything. It's a catch all term that they use so they can change ingredients without having to change the label.

    Anyway, I am not gluten intolerant, nor are most people, so I mentioned it. I suppose those with those kinds of sensitivities know they have them. :-)

  12. #12
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,917
    Clearjel is corn starch. "Modified food starch" can be corn or wheat or anything. It's a catch all term that they use so they can change ingredients without having to change the label.

    Anyway, I am not gluten intolerant, nor are most people, so I mentioned it. I suppose those with those kinds of sensitivities know they have them. :-) My mother has celiac disease, and she is an expert on what she can and cannot eat.

  13. #13
    Sustainable Stowaway
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    849
    Thanks Sally, that's good to know!

  14. #14
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288
    Sally usually manages to say everything I would have said, more elegantly than I would have done it, so I won't repeat her excellent post other than to say I concur with everything she wrote.

    As to thickeners, Sally is again right in that flour usually is a poor option. There are a couple of avenues you can take. One is Clearjel. Another is to not thicken! What I regularly do is open a jar, drain the liquid, heat it, add a bit of flour or cornstarch to make a gravy or sauce, then add the rest of the contents of the jar. Done.

    If you want to can small amounts of pasta, say in a soup, you can do it. The noodles will be very soft - think Campbell's Chicken Noodle texture - and you might not be happy with them, but you can do it.

    Me, I like to make soup and add the noodles on serving. I make homemade noodles, which are more delicate than store-bought pasta, and they tend to fall apart during canning and make an unattractive sight. But they are not "unsafe" - just unattractive.

    Rice, barley, other grains - they react the same way. They'll be very soft and mushy and won't be particularly attractive, but they are perfectly edible. I generally don't can grains like that but it's a matter of aesthetics, not safety.

    Milk is another thing that is not recommended for canning on nothing more than aesthetic grounds. If you heat milk to the degree required for pressure canning, it turns a caramelish color and develops a really flat taste, very much like reconstituted milk powder. Not terribly appetizing. But it IS safe.
    Last edited by Lisa; 01-03-2011 at 06:18 PM.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  15. #15
    Sustainable Regular Raeven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Wilds of Oregon
    Posts
    301
    Ok, I suck. My first attempt at meals in a jar was a failure. Not a single jar sealed! I think I overfilled with the liquid... next attempt, I'll be MEASURING that full inch of headspace!!

    Tastes great, though. Definitely merits another try!!
    Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change ready.

  16. #16
    Sustainable Pioneer Lisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Vermont
    Posts
    1,288
    Raeven, well shit!

    I hope you didn't toss the batch. Just take out a couple tablespoons of the beans, clean your rims and lids really well, and reprocess.

    Measuring is not a bad idea at all. If you have to err, err on the side of a bit too much headspace. An inch and a quarter instead of the standard inch won't hurt anything.

    To be safe, I'd fill the jar with beans up to maybe two inches below the rim, then add liquid to an inch and a quarter. That way the beans have plenty of room to expand.
    Last edited by Lisa; 01-03-2011 at 09:12 PM.
    Just another hippie in the hills.

  17. #17
    Sustainable Pioneer Sally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,917
    Oh, Raeven, I am so sorry! Jars that don't seal, especially when it's a bunch in one canner load, are generally due to one of two things: overfilling the jars, or seesawing the heat, thus seesawing the pressure, which can cause the jars to spew liquid.

    Beans really seem to require the head space. I did baked beans about a week ago, and I tend to go with overkill on head space - and mine overflowed. They all sealed anyway (thank you, Tattler), but it was in spite of me, not because of me.

  18. #18
    Sustainable Regular Raeven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Wilds of Oregon
    Posts
    301
    Hi, Lisa,

    Thanks for the encouragement. I appreciate it!

    I went ahead and froze this batch, and I'll be a lot more careful about the next one. The jars all spewed like crazy, so I know it was a matter of headspace... I did measure, and carefully, but I think when I did the beer/water fill, I simply overfilled the jars by about a quarter of an inch. A good lesson to learn, and thanks for your suggestions as well!
    Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change ready.

  19. #19
    Sustainable Regular Raeven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Wilds of Oregon
    Posts
    301
    Hmmm, Sally, interesting point about seesawing on the heat -- I had never thought of that, and it's a definite concern of mine! Thank you for mentioning it.

    My stove is a massive LP gas beast with burners that kick out 17,500 btu each. The burner controls are SENSITIVE, and the difference between a higher and lower flame is infintesimal. Most of the time I am glad for this sensitivity, but I had a dickens of a time getting the heat to stay at a place that the pressure canner likes! My pressure was all over the place, between 11 and 13 pounds. I was constantly fiddling with the burner heat, and the pressure would slowly rise to around 12 1/2, and I'd fiddle some more, with the pressure then dropping down to 11.... the babysitting was starting to get to me. How you manage to can on a wood burner, I have no idea -- I am in awe!

    Anyway, I'm sure the seesawing was a major factor. I'm not sure how to solve the problem. Just keep working with the stove, I guess. Ugh.

    Thanks again for the kind words and the observations -- they are helpful and appreciated!
    Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change ready.

  20. #20
    Sustainable Stowaway Grower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    North Central Ohio
    Posts
    587
    To be safe, I'd fill the jar with beans up to maybe two inches below the rim, then add liquid to an inch and a quarter. That way the beans have plenty of room to expand.
    Lisa -- I lost track -- are these the cooked beans or the uncooked ones? Thanks.
    “The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living on a small piece of land...” - Abraham Lincoln

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •